An account of three camp-meetings held by the Methodists
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An account of three camp-meetings held by the Methodists by Francis Ward

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Published by Printed by Robinson & Little in Brooklyn [N.Y.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Methodism,
  • Camp-meetings,
  • Revivals

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Francis Ward
SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 11793
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination24 p
Number of Pages24
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18050698M

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We promised, in the last number, to give in this paper some account of the earlier camp-meetings, held in this county by the Methodist. First Camp-meeting in Limestone County was held by Methodists The first camp-meeting held here by any denomination, of Christians, was held by Methodist, members of other denominations assisted and conducted by. Methodism, also called the Methodist movement, is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity which derive their doctrine of practice and belief from the life and teachings of John Wesley. George Whitefield and John's brother Charles Wesley were also significant early leaders in the movement. It originated as a revival movement within the 18th-century Church of.   Includes a photocopy of: an account of three camp-meetings held by the Methodists, by Francis Ward, published 1 Folder. Records of Barren Camp, Chetek WI by -- Call Number: ARC Barren Camp FOLDER 1 ManuscriptAuthor: Hope Brown. Many camp meetings lasted six days or even nine days. Eventually, four days became the fixed number, with meetings beginning on Friday afternoon or evening and continuing until Monday noon.

The camp meeting is a form of Protestant Christian religious service originating in England and Scotland as an evangelical event in association with the communion was held for worship, preaching and communion on the American frontier during the Second Great Awakening of the early 19th century. Revivals and camp meetings continued to be held by various denominations, and in some areas. An account of three camp-meetings held by the Methodists by: Ward, Francis. Published: () Holy leisure recreation and religion in God's square mile / by: Messenger, Troy. By , Methodist Bishop, Francis Asbury was mentioning the camp meetings frequently in his Journal; in , Asbury noted that there were four hundred camp meetings held that year among the Methodist circuits. For at least three generations, the camp meeting was an instrument wielded by Methodism in the spread of the gospel. the ‘higher Christian life.’” It would be distinct from the usual camp meetings held by Methodists and other Protestants in that, “the special objects of this meeting will be to offer united and continued prayer for the revival of the work 2 Cited in Delbert Roy Rose, A Theology of Christian Experience: Interpreting the Historic Wesleyan.

The challenge of to-day; the message of the first state convention of Methodist men held at Columbus, Ohio, Ma18,19,, (New York, Cincinnati, The Methodist book concern, [c]), by Ohio) Ohio Convention of Methodist Men (1st: Columbus and William Franklin Anderson (page images at . In the neighborhood where Joseph lived, camp meetings and other services conducted by Methodists were held so frequently at the time of the First Vision that notices of such gatherings seldom appeared in the local newspapers except when an unusual event occurred in connection with a particular meeting. So in '39, you finally had a three-way meeting in Kansas City as those three groups North-South and the Methodist-Protestant, who accepted the title of Bishops and the basic polity that Methodist. The next Methodist Conference, which was held at Liverpool, had in its agenda ‘Camp meetings’. As a result, the following pronouncement was made: ‘It is our judgement, that even supposing such meetings to be allowable in America, they are highly improper in England and likely to be productive of considerable mischief, and we disclaim all.